Cost of living Christmas dinner: Ditch slaving over hot stove with these oven-free energy-saving alternatives

Turkey shortages and the price of fuel have been two points of concern for many Britons in the lead up to Christmas. Despite a raft of alternative meats that can be served for a Christmas dinner in lieu of the traditional stuffed bird, there is still concern about how much it will cost to cook everything on the big day.

But experts at Classical Finance have created a menu that bucks the trend of slaving over a hot stove and saves money on energy during the coldest months. Or, as the experts propose, “you just want to simplify and jump on the raw bandwagon” this Christmas.

Breaking down the menu into four parts, the experts have recommended simple Hors D’oeuvres as the perfect way to start a Christmas meal. Using crackers, sliced cucumbers, or radishes, top each with a soft cheese spread and a piece of smoked salmon or tuna salad. If you want to get extra creative, caprese or antipasto kabobs are a fun twist on traditional favourites.

A popular trend for 2022, charcuterie boards can also be used to serve a selection of cold cuts of beef and ham from a local delicatessen or supermarket. Pair it with cheese, crackers, fresh fruits, olives, pickles, and nuts for an easy appetisers. Add some Christmas decor among your plating and put in some classy options. Some great additions include salmon, prosciutto, brie and goat cheese for an elegant and luxurious platter.

For the bold, tartare and sashimi can become an alternative to the large Christmas turkey this year. For a sashimi platter ensure you obtain sushi-grade fish and slide and assemble it with garnishes such as radish, carrot and cucumber. For tartare, ask a butcher for a fresh and lean cut of meat and mention it is intended to be consumed raw. Mince the steak and mix in a variety of seasonings of your choice. Mould the tartare into a small cup shape, top with an egg yolk, and serve with warm bread.

What Christmas meal would be complete without a dessert? Classical Finance have taken the guesswork out of what to serve on Christmas Day for pudding – without the pudding – suggesting cheesecakes, ice cream, chocolate mousse, and truffles as oven-free alternatives to the standard fiery fruit pud and festive pies. Homecooks can utilise small personalised dishes or create bite-sized portions that you can serve to your guests on a festive platter for a more upmarket feel.

As American research demonstrates that 8 kWh of energy is used to cook a full sized Christmas turkey, nearly enough to power your office air conditioning and HVAC unit for 16 consecutive hours, perhaps this Christmas an alternative menu might help keep the cost of living blues at bay for a brief moment.

Fleetwood Weekly News